Graphic Design – what you need, what you don’t, and how to get it DONE

Graphic Design – what you need, what you don’t, and how to get it DONE

Graphic Design – what you need, what you don’t, and how to get it DONE


Today’s Q&A will be alllll about graphic design. I’m goin’ back to my roots y’all.

I’m gonna’ talk about:
✨ What makes good design
✨ What makes bad design
✨ How to pick colors
✨ How to pick fonts
✨ Different types of files and what they’re used for
✨ The best software to use for different types of design
✨ Whether you should hire a designer or DIY
✨ Questions to ask when you hire a designer

*NOTE* This video was recorded LIVE inside my Facebook group, Brand Boldly for Service-Based Entrepreneurs as a #ThirstyThursday training video. Join the group to participate LIVE and get your questions answered in real time.

Not a video person? No worries.

Read the audio transcription below

Hey, welcome to this week’s, I almost said #SpotlightSunday. It’s not, it’s Thursday. It’s our weekly Q and A call for #ThirstyThursday, not Sunday. So I got my Dos Equis today. I’ve already had Dos Equis, but it’s really freaking hard to come up with different booze names that are also tied to design or whatever I’m talking about that week. So as always, if you have any suggestions of topics you would me to cover in the future, let me know. And it’s bonus if you can also tell me a booze that goes with it because that’s why I’m struggling. So we’re back to Dos Equis, last time I had Dos Equis it was logos and lager. This time doing design Dos Equis. So

 

I know I talked a little bit about this before, but I’m coming back to it. I’m coming back to design again. I’m coming back to it again because design is one of the things I get the most questions about. Like, no matter how much I talk about design comes last and doing all of your other pre-work first, design is still everyone’s favorite thing to talk about because it’s just the most fun honestly. So I’m going to answer some of the most common questions that I get in terms of design. And then if you have any questions, put them in the box or if you’re watching the replay, put them in the box then too. And just put Hashtag replay or tag me or whatever you want to do. I will go back and read the comments and answer any questions that you have there though.

 

I have my list and I’m going to be checking my notes. So don’t think I’m a Weirdo. I’m checking my notes to see what we’re talking about. But what makes good design? Is the first thing I want it to talk about. And I’m gonna pull out my straight up graphic design degree and use some real design terms here for you and tell you what they mean. So the first thing that makes good graphic design is use of space. Whether you’re talking about a logo or a template for a social media post or whatever it is, you want to use the space that you have appropriately. And how you do that is you think about the design terms.

 

The first one I want to talk about is balance. And again, I’m going to tell you what all these mean and balances is pretty easy one to understand. But a lot of times I see, especially on social media posts, and especially on websites, when people are talking about what it is that they do, they want to cram everything all together into these giant blocks of text or in pictures. They want to cram as much in there as they possibly can, thinking that that’s the best use of their space. It’s not. So balance is super, super important in design. So what you want to do instead is kind of space things out, obviously to make it easier to read. So it’s not a big clump of text.

 

Sorry, my dog is down there.

 

Balance means the same thing in design that it does in every other part of life. Keep keeping things in check. So you don’t want to have big giant blocks of copy and then you know, nothing down here. And then with a social media graphic, you don’t want to have all of this stuff over here on this bottom right corner and then nothing up here. Does that make sense? If you’re watching live, tell me if that makes sense. if you have any questions about that in the replay, let me know. But balance is just keeping in mind how things lay out in relation to each other, whether it’s on a screen or even even in print, too. Don’t put things too close together. Don’t put things too close to the edge. And I’ll talk about that more in a second. But balance is super important. So that’s, that’s one of the things that when you’re looking at somebody’s stuff and it just doesn’t really look right, you don’t really know what’s wrong with it. It just doesn’t look good. it usually has to do with balance or one of these other graphic designy terms I’m going to talk about in a second. it’s just like, it doesn’t feel right. And graphic design has a lot to do with how does it feel? And that’s kind of counterintuitive, but it’s super important. So balance, balance is good.

 

The next thing that’s important to have a good design is unity. That’s another graphic design term. So what that means is just how everything fits together with within itself. If we’re talking about a logo, if there’s different pieces, it’s how they fit together. if you have a graphic and then text or if you have, you know, two different typefaces, two fonts, how they fit together or on a larger scale, even. How your designs fit together as a whole. So on your website, how does your imagery fit in with your typography and your logo and your color choice and stuff that. And then also across all platforms – your consistency between your social media posts and then you click over to your website and is it unified and does it feel the same? So unity is something that’s also really, really important. And it’s another one of those things that it’s not like, oh shit, this is terrible, but it just, it feels off. If it’s not there, something just doesn’t feel right and it doesn’t feel professional and good unless those pieces are there. So balance and unity, those are, those are the first two designy words.

 

The next one you’ve probably heard a million times before from any designer on the Internet, white space is your friend. White space should be your best freaking friend in the world when you’re talking about design. So what that means is kind of what I said a minute ago too, don’t cram a whole bunch of shit into one tiny little space. You don’t need to do it. White space is your best friend ever. So when you’re writing copy for your website you don’t want giant blocks of texts because it’s ugly. But also because…

 

Tanya loves white space. Me too! And side note, I’ve gotten this question before. White space does not have to be white. It just really needs open space.

 

White space though is your best freaking friend in the world and you want to use it on everything. You don’t want giant blobs of text on your website because it’s ugly. But also because it’s not efficient. One of my favorite things about graphic design in general is it’s like a balance between form and function. Ideally. Like, yes, you want it to look pretty, but that honestly has nothing to do with graphic design. You want it to look pretty. Yes. But that’s the icing on the cake. That’s the afterthought. You need it to work well. And to use the design to get your audience to do what you want to do. So on a web page you want the text to be super easy to read and adding a bunch of white space and making it very clear – with typography and headings and stuff like that – making it very, very clear what to do next and what you want them to do is super, super important. And it just, it looks better. But so that’s in terms of a website and you want tons of white space and use it strategically to get to get to your point.

 

If you look at my homepage, my homepage is a good example. Break it up into different sections. Maybe next week we’ll talk about websites and tips specifically for your website. But each web page essentially should have a purpose and one goal for each web page. Whatever you want them to do, make sure design is leading them toward that with lots of white space. So when we’re talking about white space with social media posts and stuff that, it really comes down to not cramming a whole bunch of shit into a tiny little spot. Make sure you have plenty of space around the edges, the margins or you know, html CSS, it’s called padding, but margin, padding, white space around the edge. Don’t put stuff way too close together. Don’t make huge freaking giant headline that takes the whole thing. Keep it very clean and simple.

 

And the last design-y word – and it’s not really even a design-y word, we just learned it in design school – is simplicity. Honestly, the number one key to having good graphic design is simplicity. And it kind of pulls in all those pieces that I just talked about. Do not try to put a whole bunch of crap in one tiny spot. It doesn’t work and it looks bad. So keep everything as simple as freaking possible. And that means for your logo, you want to have no more than two different fonts. For the love of everything holy – do not put a cartoon character. Or any kind of elaborate, goofy little graphic in a logo. Unless you’re an elementary school or you know, a daycare or something, don’t do that.

 

Obviously everybody knows, you know, don’t use Comic sans and stuff that. I think that’s pretty universal by now. But keep everything as simple as possible. You don’t need some huge elaborate fancy pants logo. You need to keep it simple and clear. You want the message that you’re trying to send to be clear. Remember that it’s that balance between form and function. And if you can’t tell what it’s supposed to be, if it’s too complex and you can’t tell what it’s supposed to be, then it’s pointless no matter how pretty it looks.

 

So good design, balance, unity, white space, simplicity. That’s your goal for good design. So I know there’s some people watching live. If you have any questions, let me know. Or if that makes sense. Just give me a heart or type in yes. Or tell me if I’m way off track and you have no idea what I’m talking about. I want to know that, too.

 

Okay. So the next thing I want to talk about is what makes bad design. What makes bad design. pretty much the opposite of everything I said. Obviously, but I’ll clarify a little bit more. So the one goal with the design is, or the number one thing you want to avoid is not being legible.

 

Tamera missed the first eight minutes. That’s okay. Yeah. Listen to the replay and then if you have any questions, put them in the box and let me know. But I’m kinda going to recap everything a little bit, too.

 

So legibility is super, super important and that’s honestly the number one thing that makes bad design. And I kind of said it a second ago, but whether it’s a logo or whether it’s on your website, if you have competing things or your font is, you know, if it’s the colors too bright or too dark or blends in with the background or whatever it is, if you can’t read it, you fail. It doesn’t matter if it looks pretty it. Nothing else matters if you can’t read it. Or if it hurts your eyeballs and nobody wants to look at it. Legibility is the number one thing to focus on with design. And I know that doesn’t sound super sexy or fun, it’s not probably what anybody wants to hear about design, but that should be the number one goal ultimately. And then again, I’m going to come back to white space. I’ll say it a million times probably, but do not cram a bunch of crap onto one thing. Space it out. White space is your friend. Nothing too close to edges. Cool. Okay. So that’s bad design.

 

So one of the next questions that I get a lot is how to pick colors. How to pick colors for your, for your brand. And that’s kind of a fun one. So hopefully everybody that’s in here has already taken the archetype quiz. And there’s a lot of suggestions for that – for colors and typography and stuff that in the pdf. But I’m going to talk about it anyway. So colors and fonts. And the next thing I have on the list is how to pick font. So I’m kind of going to talk about them together a little bit. Essentially you weren’t to, with colors and fonts, your goal is to make it feel right. And I know that’s so abstract and hard to capture and honestly that’s why graphic design is a skill. Not everybody can be a graphic designer just because you have the software. But being able to capture that feel of what you’re going for and understanding how typography and colors work. So understanding how typography and colors work together to create that feel is super important.

 

Let’s say, for example, you’re a hero archetype, you want to pick colors that like, that represents strength and determination and all of those that capture the hero. So a lot of dark colors, usually black and gray and maybe a pop of red or blue or something. And keep it really simple is good for the hero archetype. Whereas maybe the innocent one is more pastels and sparkles and pretty stuff like that. So just kind of understanding that feel first and then picking colors next is going to make it a whole lot easier. And like I said, there’s examples of that in the archetype PDFs. And if anybody wants a different pdf, you can take the quiz and get yours and you get it. But if anybody wants a different pdf, just let me know and I can send it. Because you have more than one. I use three when I do stuff with my clients. So if you’ve looked at the other pages and you know your primary, but you think you also might be one and you want that pdf to just let me know and I’ll get it to you.

 

But, okay, sorry. My husband is, he works night shift and he’s asleep and I think I accidentally welcome up, but he’s good. Live video, you never know what you’re going to get.

 

But yeah, so colors – it’s really about capturing that feel. So it’s the same thing then with the typography. So I’ll stick with the same examples. The hero is going to be very simple and clean typography and maybe a different bolder, bigger style for a headline. And then very clean, simple type for the body text. Whereas you know, the innocent, you might get some of the fun little scripty fonts or handwritten fonts or something that’s more personal. So it’s about understanding how all of those pieces fit together and, and get, getting that overall feel.

 

And I’ve said this a million times, too. I say the same thing over and over again because they’re super important. I promise I’m not crazy and I don’t just repeat myself for no reason. But understanding what you want out of your design before you ever start trying to design it – is super, super important. That’s why graphic designers don’t like a lot of clients. I remember when I first did freelance design. If you don’t know my backstory at all, I started out doing just graphic design and now I’ve transitioned into the brand strategy and stuff. But I hated working with clients at first because no one ever knows what they want. And I would get that stuff all the time. Like, well I, I kinda know what I like, but really I’ll know it when I see it. And that is the quickest way to make your designer hate your freaking guts.

 

So it’s really, really important to understand what your goal is, what you’re going forward and get that feel. So even if you can’t say, I want this font with this color and make it look like whatever, it doesn’t have to be that specific. As long as you can articulate the goal and the feel that you’re going for and how you want to relate to your audience. That’s what you need to understand before you try to design it. So colors and fonts should be, honestly, they should be easy to pick as long as you know all of that stuff beforehand. But there are some basic things. A really cool thing that I always to recommend people do is look up the psychology of color stuff and you can just Google it or go on Pinterest and I don’t, I’ve never written a resource for it because there’s no need to reinvent the wheel. It’s been done a million times. blue is calming and you know, purple is regal. Just look up the color psychology because there are some fundamental basics. You don’t want to have hot pink on a hero brand usually. Usually. Unless it’s…

 

There, there are exceptions to all of these rules, too. Depending on how the archetypes fit together, your primary and your other ones. None of these are hard and fast rules. You get to decide. As long as it’s legible and as long as it has a white space, you can pretty much make up the rest of the rules. But these just give you a really good starting point. And if you’re like, shit, I have no idea what I want – this will give you a really strong starting point to start from there and have something to build on. Because it’s always, always easier to have something to base it on. Especially if you’re going to go hire a designer. Giving them something is better than just saying I have no idea what I want, cause they’ll hate you and then you won’t get what you’re looking for either. Not only will they hate you, but you probably won’t get very good results. So colors and fonts. If you have any questions, any more questions about colors and fonts, now’s the time to put them in. It looks I have some other stuff, so I’m going to check them out real quick.

 

So the performer archetype, Tamera, that’s another one that’s just fun. And again, it depends on what the other two archetypes are also. But usually it’s bright colors. And that doesn’t mean like, hot pink and yellow, a lot of different bright colors, but usually one bright color as the primary color. And then some others, you know, softer tones to kind of back it up. But the performer’s about making a statement right off the bat and pulling that energy out. So definitely one or two brighter colors. And then, that’s where you could pick a fun font. A fun typeface to do for headings and stuff that. Maybe a scripty one or maybe just a really unique, different fun font.

 

And I will say this about fonts too before we move on. When I say a headline font or heading, those should be used very sparingly. So if you have a script or a unique font, use it very sparingly. it’s because usually they’re harder to read first of all. So you don’t want to have anything that’s small, your body text of your website or anything that. Don’t use anything that. Or even if you have a really long headline, make sure that it’s legible first and foremost.

 

The fonts are super, super fun. I have thousands of fonts installed on my computer and I love playing with them. Just remember legibility. And if you have a font that you just freaking love, but when you put it in there and it as a headline and it’s really hard to read, don’t use it. No matter how much you love it. Don’t use it. Use it for something else. Like, if you want to use it for you know, your logo or something that isn’t super important to read, that’s fine, but make sure you can read it with the fun fonts. Okay.

 

Now I’m going to read the questions. So I answered the performer. Hi Husband. He went back to sleep now too. I think he just had to pee. So what questions should we ask ourselves to get an idea of what our goal is?

 

Okay. So that’s going to come down to your ideal client research. Which I think I, I don’t remember if I’ve done a video specifically on ideal client because I talk about it and every freaking video, but I do have a resource. An ideal client workbook and a little tutorial video separately. I can send that to you if you want, but that’s really where you figure out what your goals are. It’s really a combination of your overall mission, vision for your business and what you, what you want to help your clients do and what you… I guess, yeah, whatever your goal is for how you’re gonna help your clients should be the same as your goal for your design. So for me, I want to help my clients use their personality to attract their ideal clients. That’s kinda my thing. My overarching mission. Is just be yourself. Use your own personality. Don’t be fake. So I try to put those aspects into my design too. My logo is the scripty font. So it’s kind of fun and I use that very sparingly on my website and it’s, everything is very legible.

 

So when you’re asking yourself what your goals are specifically for design, make sure that you’re referencing your overall goals for how you want to relate to your audience. When you’re doing the ideal client research, not only are you learning every single thing about your ideal client, but you also want to think about how do you want your ideal client to perceive you? Do you want them to think you’re super fun or you’re super reliable? And again, all of this stuff comes back to those archetypes, too. Those fundamental traits of your brand that – whatever your goal is, your archetype should help you figure that out a lot. But if you have any more specific questions, I’m happy to answer them. Hopefully that answered what you were looking for.

 

Emotions are a good way to help designers. I want my website to be exciting. Yes. Yeah.

 

Tanya’s website is a great example of combining those different archetypes. I think you have purple for your main and then some blue also. But it is exciting, having that pop of color is fun and exciting. But it’s also the language that you use and your copywriting is more that regular guy/gal archetype where it’s very relatable and comfortable and nurtured, like you said. So checkout Tanya’s website guys. Cause it’s a great example of pulling those different archetypes together and making a whole cohesive feel with your archetypes. So

 

Tamera, the magician is my second. Yeah, the magician is a really fun one because you can do so much different stuff with the magician archetype. You can go the woo-woo-y way where people talk about the crystals and all of those Emerald Greens and purple colors are really popular with the magician archetype. But then you can also go the scientist-y almost way – the really old vintage type stuff is also popular with the magician. So it’s very flexible. So that’s a really fun one. That’s a fun one to have. Hey Kristy. Yes, Tanya, you should be blushing. Your website is awesome.

 

Any more questions that you have about anything we’ve talked about up until this point? Good design, balance, unity, white space, simplicity, bad design. You need it to be legible and white space, again. Don’t cram a bunch of crap together. Colors and fonts should be based on your feel and your overall goal for what you want your ideal client to think about your brand when they look at it and what obviously your goal, whatever you want to portray. So that’s everything we talked about so far. Any questions if you have them.

 

Let’s see, is there somewhere on Pinterest that we can look up colors for archetypes? I know that there is. As soon as we get off here, I’ll hop on Pinterest and find the ones that I use. I also, I have a book back here. I feel that’s a pain in the ass though, to try to show you guys in a book, but there are tons of them on Pinterest so I’ll find one that I and I’ll post the link in here when we get done.

 

They’re in the PDFs. Yeah, they’re in the PDFs also. There are different color palettes that go with each archetype. And again too, if for anybody that came in late, if you have your primary archetype pdf, but you know what your other ones are and you want that, just let me know and I’ll send it to you.

 

When I look at performer, it’s interesting. Yeah, the performer is one of the most misunderstood ones I feel like. Because I feel like people think it’s just about like, oh, it’s all fun and games and people don’t take it seriously. But the performer can be super serious. It’s about lightening the mood though. So it does usually have a pop of color, but it’s overdone a lot of times and it’s hurts your eyes a lot of times. So it’s harder to do it right, but if you can do it right, it’s one of the coolest ones. I really liked the performer.

 

And Pinterest boards. Yeah. Yes I do. I have Pinterest boards for each archetype too. And so do a bunch of other people online. Obviously I didn’t invent archetypes. There are other brand strategists that use them also. Amber that was in here last Sunday, she also has a quiz and I think she has some Pinterest boards and there are a bunch of other people that do them, too. So Pinterest is a really, really good resource for colors and typography specifically in relation to each archetype.

 

Joy is what I want to bring, but also truth. Yeah. Yeah. So that’s totally doable. Joy is definitely the performer, bring out the lighter side and keep it fun. But it’s so cool when you can get it right and pull out that deeper meaning behind it because that’s what usually gets lost when people try to do it is they focus too much on the fun and not enough on the other stuff. So tying all of those archetypes together makes it work so much better. So you got it. You got it. Tamera.

 

Okay. So I’m going to go a little bit techie for a second and talk about specific file types in design and what they’re used for. Because I get this question all the time. So if you’ve ever worked with a designer, I’m sure that you’ve probably heard some of these words and types, so I’m just going to give a basic overview. And then as always, if you have specific questions, just type them in the box and I’ll answer them.

 

Let’s start with a jpeg. A jpeg is a photo file, essentially it is. You can save it as whatever size you want, but it’s essentially a photo file. And what that means is if you have a Jpeg, let’s say of your logo, and it’s three inches by five inches or whatever, and you want to make it bigger and blow it up, it’s going to look shit. Because a jpeg is made up of pixels. And if you blow them up, it becomes pixelated. That’s what pixelated mean. It’s a bunch of little dots that make up a photo file. If you’ve ever zoomed in really, really close on a picture, you’ll see what I’m talking about. So that’s a jpeg. So if you’re going to use a jpeg in your design, you need to make sure that it’s sized appropriately. If you need a jpeg of your logo, make sure that you know where it’s going. If it’s going on your website and it’s going in the header bar on your website, make sure you check and see what size your template recommends and make sure you export your jpeg into the correct size. Because if you try to blow it up, it’s going to look crap. That’s a jpeg.

 

The next one that you see a lot in design and that I recommend using a lot is a PNG file, a png. It’s essentially the same as a jpeg in that, it’s made up of pixels. Also the same things apply. It needs to be the exact same size that you need it because you can’t blow it up. But a PNG file has a transparent background. So like the little logo in the bottom of my screen, see if I can point to it right there. That’s a PNG file because there’s no background on it. So if you have a jpeg of your logo and it has a white background and you try to put it on a colored background and you have this hideous white box around it. You need a PNG file that doesn’t have the background in it. So that’s the difference between those two.

 

Then we get into actual design files. So you have… I’m gonna back up and I’m going to talk about the different design software first. Most people use Canva or something that to do their design because most people, most small business owners are not also graphic designers. So you don’t have Photoshop and Illustrator and all that stuff. If you do, that’s awesome. But it’s not necessary. But just so you guys understand what I’m talking about, I’m going to explain those different softwares and what they do.

 

So there’s Adobe Photoshop. I’m sure everybody in the entire world knows what Photoshop is. Photoshop is for editing photos, pictures. So they’re “rasterized” and that’s all that means is what I was talking about before. They’re made up of small little pixels. And if you blow them up, they look crap. That’s the type of images that Photoshop works with. You can edit colors and Photoshop is the most amazing thing on the planet. I love, I love Photoshop, but you have to know what it’s used for. It’s not for creating logos, it’s for editing photos. So you can resize them, you can crop them, you can change colors, and you can do all this amazing stuff. It’s awesome.

 

So then on the other side we have Adobe Illustrator and that’s where you make “vector” graphics. So vector graphics are what you would make a logo in. So a vector graphic can be scaled to any size that you want it. You can blow it up to a freaking billboard if you want it that big. That just means that they’re not made up of a whole bunch of different pixels. They’re solid lines and you can blow it up as big as you want. That’s why logos are made an Illustrator. Now you can export them into different sizes and to put into Photoshop or whatever else you need to use it for. But understanding the difference between those two softwares is how you’re going to know what to use when and what to ask your designer for.

 

Let’s say you hire a graphic designer to make you a logo. You want to make sure that you always get those vector files. So that could be an Adobe Illustrator file – it’s .ai – or an .eps is what you might also see it called. It’s encapsulated postscript, which you don’t need to know that, but an eps file is a vector file. You can make it as big as you want. Always, always, always get those for any kind of logo type type design.

 

I just dumped all that. That was a lot of techie stuff. So if you have any specific questions about what file should I use when or anything that, put it in the comments, let me know. I realize that was tech heavy and some of that you don’t need to know. But hopefully that will just help you understand why things are done a certain way.

 

What’s next on our list here? The best software to use for different types of designs. I just talked about that, Illustrator versus Photoshop. So then we can talk about Canva. Canva is awesome. That’s if you don’t have Photoshop, that’s what I always recommend. Everybody use is Canva. And if you can, spring for the paid version of Canva because you can save your brand colors and you can make templates that are much easier to work with in Canva if you have the paid version. But the free version works too. It just takes a little bit more time to get everything set up how you want it, and to use it, it takes a little bit more time. But it’s still totally works. Just remember what we talked about a second ago – if you’re making a template for a social media post in Canva and you want your logo on it, you’re going to want to put the PNG file in there because as a transparent background. Unless it’s already a white background and then a jpeg wouldn’t matter.

 

But hopefully all of your stuff is not just white backgrounds. Hopefully. I have seen people a bunch of times where all of their design is super simple and everything’s on white backgrounds just because they can’t cut out their logo and they only have a jpeg version. So make sure – that’s why it’s really important to get the right file types that you need when you’re working with a designer. So that you can design things how you want and not have to just use plain white backgrounds because that’s the only thing that looks good with your logo.

 

Okay. So proud, I knew most that. Yay. I’m glad you did too, Tanya.

 

Yeah. You can’t download [a png] in Canva, but you can upload your png file to Canva. And then if you want to have a different background.

 

You found my Pinterest. Yay. I love Pinterest. Pinterest is the best thing ever.

 

But yeah, Tanya, you can upload your png file and put it on whatever you want and then export it. Maybe tell me what you’re trying to do specifically in Canva and why you want to export it with a transparent background, and then maybe I can help you a little bit more. But hopefully you can just upload your logo into Canva and design it however you want and then export it back out as a complete graphic and you wouldn’t need it to be transparent. But if you’re trying to do something else, let me know and I can try to help you.

 

Okay. So next up is whether you should hire a designer or try to DIY. That’s a fun question. So if you are going to DIY – I always like people to try to do that first anyway, honestly. I know that’s probably weird to say coming from a designer, but I think at least trying to do it yourself first will help you figure out what you want and what you don’t want a little bit faster than going back and forth with a designer. So at least try to do it. There’s no harm in trying unless you’re just eff this, I got way too much money and not enough time, perfect world situation, then go for it. But I always to have people at least try it first. it’ll give your designer that starting point.

 

But if you are to the point where you’ve tried and you’re lifk, eff this, I can’t do it and you want to hire a designer. Then some of the questions you should ask and how to pick a designer is going to be the next really important step.

 

Sorry, I don’t know what the heck my dog is doing. She’s this giant pit bull. I don’t know if she’ll walk back or if you can see her. She’s humongous. But she thinks she’s a little tiny and tries to cram into tiny spots and knocks everything over. So she’s fun.

 

Anyway I, wrote an article on my blog a long time ago. I can post the link in here – that goes really deep into the different types of designers that you can hire and what the different types are good for and how much you should pay and all of that stuff. So I’ll just summarize it and then I’ll put the link if you want to read it in more detail.

 

Essentially the first thing you want to do is figure out what type of designer you need. Make your list of what you’re looking for before you even start looking. Maybe you just need a logo and you’re comfortable enough in Canva to make the rest of your stuff and make it match and make it look good. Or maybe you’re like, eff that, and you want your entire design package done. Like, you want your logo and you want social media graphics and you want cover images for your stuff and business cards. Just make out your list beforehand because that’s going to help you know who to pick.

 

There are tons and tons and tons of different designers out there and different types of designers out there. And you can pay literally anything. You can go on Fiverr and pay five bucks for a logo. You might get lucky and it might be really good or it might be total shit. It’s kind of the luck of the draw over there. Or you can pay thousands and thousands and thousands of dollars for a logo. It really just depends on what you need. So if you only need a logo, if you don’t need any of the other stuff, if you only need a logo, I would look for a freelance designer. Somebody that just does design. They just call themselves a graphic designer. That would be the way to go.

 

And, keep in mind when I’m talking about whether or not you should hire a designer, this is with the understanding that you already know all of the answers to all of the strategy stuff. You’d know your ideal client the back of your freaking hand. You have your target audience narrowed down. You’re very specific about what your offer is and how you’re going to present it. All of that stuff, all of the other branding things that I talk about in here all the time, your messaging, all of that stuff, you need to know that before you hire a designer because just a graphic designer is not going to help be able to help you with any of that. A graphic designer is a – it’s the difference between a service provider versus an expert. An expert is somebody who you can go to and say, I’m trying to do this, and they’ll help you figure it out. Just a straight up graphic designer doesn’t do that. They’re gonna expect you to tell them what you want and what you need, and then they’re just the hands that execute. So if you’re going to go that route would be very, very clear and very specific about what you need.

 

That doesn’t mean that it –that doesn’t mean they’re not good. That’s what I used to do all the time. They have their purpose and they’re good at what they do. But they only do their thing. And you have to take on a lot of the responsibility of understanding all of those aspects of your brand before you go hire them.

 

Let me read down here real quick. Because I’m that person, my background is white. So Tanya, I feel like you told me you made your logo yourself? So what did you make it in that you couldn’t export it? That you couldn’t have it on a transparent background? That would be interesting to know. Sorry, my phone’s going off over here.

 

I have way too much money. Yeah. Yeah, it does. Trying to DIY, it just helps you get more clear on what it is you’re looking for and what it is you hate. Because you might not know until you try stuff and just trying stuff that is going to cost you money with a designer. They’re they’re not going to try stuff for you for free unfortunately. So that’s why I always recommend trying it first.

 

Swift Publisher 4. I’m going to be honest, I don’t even know what that is. I know that even in Word and Pages and stuff that, if it’s just a simple type of graphic logo, it’s just text, you can save stuff as a pdf and they have transparent backgrounds. A pdf usually does. Depending your settings. So maybe try that and then convert that pdf into something else. There’s lots of stuff online where you can just Google pdf file converter and change it into something else. Or that’s something that is really good for Fiverr and Upwork and the cheaper ones that. If it’s just something really simple like that. Like, Hey, I have this, I need you to recreate it in this format and send it back to me. That’s a really good use of those different platforms. Instead of paying, you know, a $75 an hour graphic designer to do simple stuff that. So that’s what I would suggest Tanya.

 

Photoshop is not cheap at all. But I can’t function without it. It’s my favorite thing ever. Yeah. Transparent PDFs. Yup. Check it out.

 

Okay. So, those are basically the different types of designers then. So you have the super, super low, low end Fiverr type stuff. Honestly, most of those aren’t “real designers” and that’s probably totally snobby of me to say. I did go to design school, so I get to be a snob about it. But those are usually the people who just bought the software and learned how to work the software and don’t have a strong grasp on those basic design principles that I talked about at the beginning. That’s why a lot of times you don’t have a lot of luck with them. And then also they don’t usually have a ton of experience working with clients. It might be that maybe they are good at design, but maybe they just are doing it just to make money and they don’t really have those interpersonal client to designer skills. They don’t know the right questions to ask to get the information that they need. And you end up going back and forth with a million different revisions and it’s not right. If you go that route, make sure you’re very, very, very specific on what you want.

 

Then the next level would be a freelance designer. Somebody who just does it on the side or they’re just starting their business. That’s going to be the middle ground pricing. You can find them anywhere from 30 to a hundred bucks an hour. When I did it, I charged 75 an hour. They usually are much better at what they do. They’re a little bit more expensive, but if you do need a little bit more help, that’s the way to go. And then there’s an agency. A full on agency that does stuff and that’s where it’s going to be really expensive, but they’re gonna help you a lot more with the process and figuring that stuff out.

 

You can pay literally any amount of money you want and you get what you pay for. That’s what it comes down to, honestly. You get what you pay for. I’ll share the article when you get off of here, just so you can see. I made a little, what’s it called, a Venn diagram where we you the circles and stuff that overlaps. And it’s essentially quality, price and speed. And you can only pick two. And that’s true for design just it is with pretty much everything else. You can get it fast and cheap, but it’s going to be blegh, yeah. So you can only pick two of those. You get what you pay for. That’s what it comes to with design. And again, that’s why I recommend at least trying it first. You’re going to have much better results.

 

If you decided the type of designer that you want. You do want to hire it out and you’ve already tried and you’ve said eff it, I suck at this, and you want to hire it out. The type of questions that you should ask them and what to look for when you go to hire a designer are important. So you want to look at the type of stuff they usually work on, first of all. If you can find a specific niche designer, that’s best. I know there’s a lot of graphic designers. It’s like, I’m a graphic designer for the health and fitness industry or I’m a designer for doctor’s offices or whatever it is. You’re going to have much better results if you can find one that does that stuff all the time because they are going to know the right questions to ask. So figure out what they usually do and if it aligns with what your goal is and what what you’re trying to do. Because it’s going to be much harder if not.

 

That’s the first question. If they have a portfolio, look at it. A portfolio isn’t always the best indicator honestly though, because I feel like it’s like a resume almost. Like you just put the pretty stuff out there and not necessarily the stuff that people need to see. So I don’t even share a portfolio anymore. I have a couple where I’ll call it out in testimonials and stuff and be like, ooh, I made this one. I have one of those on my site, but I don’t, I don’t usually share that unless people specifically ask for it. Just because I feel that’s not the most important thing.

 

The next thing, and I feel like I’ve talked about a little bit of this stuff before, so I’m not going to go too deep into it. I think the logos and lager, if you go over in the events tab and look at the past events, I talked about hiring a designer a lot in that one. The next most important question I would say is the price – not necessarily just how much is it, but what all is included in the price. And we talked earlier about making a list of the specific things that you need and try to find a designer that includes all of those things. If it’s your logo and your social media package and all of that stuff together, try to find one that does the most for the most amount of money, you know, common sense.

 

But that’s my list. I’ve gone through my whole list now of design stuff. This was a long one today. I’ve been on here forever. So if anybody has any specific questions about design or anything else, let me know and I will answer them. If you watch the replay, if you’re watching the replay, same thing. Always put it in your questions. I always go back and look at them.

 

Why we should be brand besties. Amber, yes. Brand besties. We should the Hashtag that! Alliteration. Yes.

 

If there’s enough work in it, you can get the general idea of their abilities still. Yeah, especially if you’re hiring – and I didn’t really talk about this – I think that’s what I’ll do next week is talking about website stuff. Specifically web designers and website stuff like the purpose of your website. But if you are hiring a designer and they say that they’re a web designer and they say that they’re a really good graphic designer, not only their portfolio, but look at their own stuff. Like, I can’t tell you how many times I go to people’s websites and they’re like, I’m a wordpress designer and I’m so good at this and look at all my stuff and my portfolio, but their own website looks shit. Look at that, too. Not just what they can do for others. Because it’s important what they can do for their clients obviously, but having their own shit together tells you a lot about them. Hopefully it’s good. But I see it all the time where it’s not good. So check their own stuff.

 

I look for for variety. Yeah, especially if you go for a, just not a specialized niche designer, just a freelance graphic designer – that’s where you would really want to look at the variety of different things that they do and specifically if they can do what you’re looking for. That’s where those archetypes come in, too. If you’re a hero archetype, but most everything in their portfolio is frilly, sparkly, girly stuff, it’s probably not a good fit. Just really understanding what you need and what you want before you get in there and start talking to people is really important.

 

That is my design stuff and I wanted to talk about it today because I have openings in my Brand Boldly program. So that is my four month coaching program. But I just changed it up. And I’m super effing excited about it. So I have three spots open right now, but the way that I just changed it as I added back in all of the design stuff. And I’m super freaking excited about it.

 

So how it’s set up now is you have the four months of coaching and strategy and pretty much everything I talk about in here all the time. Check out the page if you want to know more about the coaching part of it. But I’ve added in every single part of your design, too. So if you work with me one on one for four months, you get your entire brand strategy and also your logo, your complete website done by me, 100%, you don’t have to touch it, and all the copywriting, all of the words on all of the pages done by me and all of your graphic design, also. So templates for everything that are completely on brand from a Pinterest pin to a Facebook cover photo. Literally whatever you need is all included in there now. It didn’t used to be, but now it is and I’m super effing excited about it.

 

If you need help with that stuff, check out the program and send me a message. Send me a message on messenger if you think you might be a good fit for it. If not, that’s cool too. I’m always here if you need me. I also have a smaller, an intensive, a two hour intensive is a really good place to start. If you’re thinking about getting help with your branding but you’re not really sure what you need or where you are with your brand right now, the intensive is a really, really good place to start. It’s a two hour session and we dig really, really deep in there. I’ll put the link in the comments, but it’s also always in the sidebar in the description of the group, too. If you have any questions about any of that, if you think you might be interested, just send me a message and let’s talk about it.

 

I’m so happy that you guys came and watched my design stuff and leave any questions in the box if you have any questions. So yeah, super effing excited. Yes, I’m super excited. It’s going to be awesome. So yeah, I will see you guys on Sunday and I can’t wait to read all your questions and answer all your stuff. Bye! Have a good night!

 

If I can figure out how to exit out of this. I feel like a giant dork just waving my arms around. Okay. Got it. Bye guys.

 

Other things you might’ve searched for: online business branding, brand coach, branding coach, brand strategist, branding coach, brand archetypes, brand archetype, brand archetype quiz, how to pick brand colors, what colors should I use, what fonts should I use, how do I know what colors I need, color psychology, brand colors, brand fonts, brand logos, how to create a logo
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Hey, I’m Brooke!

I’m a Creator archetype, INTJ, and music snob. I will fight you if you try to convince me that a MacBook is an instrument. It’s not.

But as far as this whole business thang goes… I’m basically a weird mix of creative-big-picture-thinker and analytical strategery all rolled into one.

I can help you use your unique personality to stand out BOLDLY online and attract your ideal clients like a freakin’ magnet – just by being YOU.


Can’t get enough of  this stuff?!

Check out a few more blog posts

Badass bios for personal brands with Amber Brooks

Badass bios for personal brands with Amber Brooks

Badass bios for personal brands with Amber Brooks

Amber Brooks is a copywriter and brand voice strategist (ummmm hello #communityovercompetition, right?! LOVING THIS SO MUCH!!!)

Amber’s coming in to teach us about how to have a non-blah bio that makes people LOVE you – Badass Bios for Personal Brands.

Amber’s website: amberbrooks.co

Download Amber’s “Badass Bios for Personal Brands” to learn how you can write about yourself and make it sound interesting: amberbrooks.co/badass-bios

*NOTE* This video was recorded LIVE inside my Facebook group, Brand Boldly for Service-Based Entrepreneurs as a #SpotlightSunday feature. Join the group to participate LIVE and get YOUR biz featured to the group for free.

Not a video person? No worries.

Read the audio transcription below

Brooke Lawson:

Hello! We are live for #SpotlightSunday with Amber Brooks who is amazing and I totally butchered Heather’s intro last time, so I’m going to let you make your own introduction today because you will do a much better job of it. But Amber is awesome and let’s just start there. Let’s introduce Amber and learn about you and your business and what you do.

 

Amber Brooks:

Hey everybody, I’m Amber. I’m a brand strategist and copywriter. I help coaches, consultants and strategists with all their messaging by developing their brand voice and identity and then really compelling copy in that place they can reach more people make a big impact. One of the reasons I originally connected with Brooke is because we have the same mission and the same beliefs, right? By the way, Brooke, I came up with the top five reasons why we should be like, business besties, right? So first of all, your first name is Brooke, my last name is Brooks. So we both love branding, right? Bonus, we both both have archetype systems, right? Bonus, we both love drinks and we both like to keep it real.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Heck yes! That’s awesome. I love it. I think had said in the intro in the group for you, I said hello community over competition. This is perfect because we do very similar things, but it’s awesome. It’s so good to meet other people who do similar things, too. And we’re not competition. Anybody that’s done the archetype stuff will know that your people go to you and my people will come to me and that’s just how it is and it’s awesome and I love it.

 

Amber Brooks:

Yeah, totally.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Cool. So I always like to ask everybody – and I apologize, my mouse isn’t working today so I’m leaning over here looking at my notes, that’s what I’m doing – but I always like to ask everybody to share their definition of branding and I’m really interested to hear yours since that’s kind of your thing too.

 

Amber Brooks:

For me, your brand is basically the soul of your business; it’s the heart and soul of your business, right? It’s how people perceive your business and how they connect to you and why they connect to you. The things that are built into the identity of your brand are the things that align with the identity of your market as well, right? Because those things come together to build this symbiotic relationship. And that’s how I view my brands.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Cool. I love it. You got some big fancy words in there, too. I love it. Okay, cool. Today then, Amber is going to teach us about how to write badass bio’s. And I know, at least for me, that’s always something that I’ve struggled with – is talking about myself and how to do that without sound like a freaking dork and also make yourself I seem an expert. I’m excited to hear what you got for us and just whenever you’re ready to dig in, let’s do it.

 

Amber Brooks:

Okay. So the thing is, people get so hung up on bios because first of all, people hate to talk about themselves. First of all, they hate talking about themselves. Second of all, they think that when they’re writing their bio, it has to be this super professional stagnate thing, right? It has to be this resume type thing. And so I think that’s what trips people up a lot. The truth of the matter is your bio should align with your brand. It shouldn’t be based on these preconceived notions of – a lot of them come from corporate mentality or the employee mindset – and we’re used to thinking in terms of that type of language and expectation that when we come into the entrepreneurial world, it’s like our minds immediately make us want to try to fit into that box. Right? So the biggest thing with writing your bio is to make sure that it fits your brand and your personality first of all.

 

Amber Brooks:

And if they had it like, very organic and appealing to your clients and your ideal client may be that corporate type professional, right? That’s quite possible. And if so, that’s fine. But for people like us and our clients, most of the time, that’s not the case. For people in your group, that’s not the case. Your bio gives your audience a glimpse of what they can expect from us and allows them to believe in us a little bit so that they want to dive in deeper and learn more, right? We need to make sure that we are appealing to people’s senses so that they do want to learn more about us and not get that corporate-y facade and just get turned off.

 

Amber Brooks:

A lot of times people don’t understand how widely they can use their bio’s too, right? Your bio can be used in all the places. It can be used on your blog. It can be used on your about page. It can be used as a media kit. It can be used in speaker profiles if you’re going to a conference or something that. It can be in your ebook. I think that people skip over it sometimes. But it’s really something that people need to focus on because you’re going to be able to use it everywhere.

 

Brooke Lawson:

For sure. Well I think it’s really important, too, to just show consistency across all of those platforms, too. Just because you have an awesome bio on your website, then they go look at you somewhere else on social media or whatever, you want it to have that same feel and match and be awesome everywhere else, too. Right?

 

Amber Brooks:

Hopefullyl. TolAnd so another thing is your bio’s going to include your selling proposition right now, your competition. So the thing that you’re offering the world, the benefit you’re offering that’s going to be built into your bio and then it’s going to be everywhere and that’s what it’s going to help people understand. what is it that you have to offer that they should be paying attention to? um, by the way, if anyone has quefstions, drop them in this bread and I’ll come in later and answer any questions that always, but the bottom line is yes, definitely. So I pay attention to burrow through. I love it. It’s a little, it’s Kinda like, it’s Kinda like when you’re in their urban city and there’s that little underground hangout and find their friends and what you’ve heard of is, oh, that’s so awesome.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Well too, if you’re not an Amber’s group, for sure. Check that out and we can put the, share the link in the comments for sure. But Amber’s group is awesome and growing crazy too. So whenever you want to talk about that, go for it.

 

Amber Brooks:

Yeah, we can do that. Okay. So in your bio, you want to summarize overall what’s your value prop is right? So mine is that I help entrepreneurs create that transformative growth through their voice and compelling copy. So whatever your value prop is, that should be built into your bio, right? You have your bottom line, which is your unique selling proposition or your value prop. And then you have the what, what is it that you do? Are you a digital marketer, are you a web developer? Are you brand strategist? What is it that you do? What is your specialized skill? Then I to also include the why. So what makes you so passionate about what you do? What is it that sparks that passion within you to do what you do. Because when people are looking to work with you, collaborate with you, bring you on as a guest blogger or anything that, they want to know that you aren’t just fulfilling a job, that you’re passionate about what you do. There’s a reason for it. Right?

 

Amber Brooks:

Also, building in your expertise. And when I talking about expertise, I’m not saying pack all your degrees and your certificates and things that. That’s not what we’re doing in our bio. We’re not name dropping or anything like that. And then also I to make it a little bit intriguing and then always, always, always have a call to action. And that’s like the one thing that’s missing from a lot of bios. They put the information there, it’s a little, right? But then there’s nowhere to go from it. There’s no call to action. I see your bio, but like, that’s nice, but what do I do with it? So include a call to action so that they know how to get in touch with you, how to work with you, how to get a freebie, how to sign up for your course. Exactly.

 

Amber Brooks:

I always to go over a little bit of the do’s and don’ts in your bio, too, because people get so confused about bio’s and I can tell them all all day long how to write a bio and they sit down and they look at their screen and they’re like….uhhh…. what do I do? Okay what now?

 

Amber Brooks:

Okay. So do’s. You do put your personality in. You are your brand. We say this all the time. Put that personality in there. That’s something you know, you guys know Brooke is all in, right? She’s all in her brand and you know exactly what you get when you see her on Facebook, Instagram, blog. You know what you’re getting, right? So put that personality in there. That’s what makes me connect to Brooke. That’s what’s going to help people connect you guys. So don’t be scared to put yourself out there. And that fear is really what holds a lot of people back.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Amen!

 

Amber Brooks:

Yes! Stop holding back! Don’t filter, people!

 

Amber Brooks:

Okay, so also include things that are going to strengthen your positioning. So you know, if you have experience as an interior designer and you are now doing digital marketing for interior designers, that’s going to be relevant, right? Use language that’s very natural to you. Don’t, you know, force it. So if you’re someone whose mouth is conservative in person and you think it feels cool to go online and like, curse first more than usual or whatever, people are going to sense that lack of authenticity a mile away. So don’t force it. Be natural. And it’s funny, but we see it all the time. Right? We see that sort of, fake authenticity all day long. It’s just so easy to spot.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, no, I was just going to say, I don’t know if you watched Heather’s #SpotlightSunday last week about being on live video and showing up, but I think that, at least for me, that has helped my business a lot. To just kind of get out of your head and just be yourself. Because when you’re on live you’re like, welp this is it. There’s no time to prepare or try to be fake or be anything else. So that’s at least helped me a lot, because I did come from that corporate environment where it’s you have to be all professional and it took me a while to get out of that mode. It’s been really helpful to just be me. It’s just so much easier once you can kind of get past that and figure it out.

 

Amber Brooks:

You know, I’m so glad you brought that up because people do think that they have to put that corporate, professional face on with their bio. And you don’t. I freaking loved her Spotlight. It was like, spot on. I was like, oh my God, you’re calling out all the things. When I came on the entrepreneurial space, I wouldn’t do live. I wouldn’t even record myself speaking, not even without video. It was hard for me to even get on a client call. Those things totally freaked me out. But it is what it is. You gotta put yourself out there and you have to be yourself. She has some really good tips to break through those boundaries, too. I would probably go back and watch that like, 10 more times. Because I’m still like…

 

Brooke Lawson:

It was so good!!

 

Amber Brooks:

Okay, I thought I was there, Heather, but obviously I need to step it up some more. Yeah. Okay. So be yourself. And with the visibility and talking about being yourself, it’s important, too, to try and make your introduction to people a lot of times. And think about it you’re at a networking event. When you’re at a networking event, people are going to ask you what you do, and what’s your story, and what’s your experience, right?

 

Amber Brooks:

But the people online aren’t necessarily going to get that chance to ask you in person. So your bio is that introduction? If you could just think of it that. If you’re someone who maybe is more comfortable talking in person, then that might help you write your bio. The other thing I would say is just be consistent. Whatever bio that you have built, and then modify it for each platform. So you know Instagram only gives you unlimited number of characters, right? You’re going to need to make it more concise and chunk it down for the platform. But it’s still needs to align with your full bio on your website. Right?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah. So what do you recommend then when you’re narrowing it down? What do you feel like are the most important parts to leave in? You had mentioned including your why and your what and your personality and all that stuff. So how do you go about narrowing it down and picking out the important parts?

 

Amber Brooks:

The big three are audience, the benefit, and the what you do. I do X for Y and you’ll get Z. Those are the big ones. Because I want to know if you’re speaking to me, I want to know what I’m going to get out of it. Right? What’s in it for me? Everyone wants to know what’s in it for me? I don’t really care about you, what are you gonna do for me?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Exactly. Hey Heather! Heather’s giving us a million hearts right now!

 

Amber Brooks:

Hey Heather! I do have some don’t’s, though. Just don’t be overly formal. There is a difference between being professional and formal. You can be professional without being formal. You can be business casual. You can be yourself without keeping it sterile and unapproachable. Using a lot of jargon – that just turns people off. Psychobabble, yeah. Don’t do it. You also don’t, I think I mentioned this earlier, but you don’t want to list out every degree, award, certificate, trophy, participation trophy. Don’t want to do that. Momma might care about that, but the people who want to hire you, not so much.

 

Amber Brooks:

Don’t forget the call to action. You want to send them somewhere once they’ve read a little bit about you and they want to know what the next step is. Then I guess the next biggest one is the passive voice. And this is something that confuses a lot of people. It’s the difference between active and passive voice. Passive voice is like when you talk about some things being done to you. Active voice is talking about what you’re doing. Someone might say, if you’re interested in my services, you can call me – that’s passive, right? Giving people more of an option, right? So instead you would want to say something like, sign up for my course, and then drop the link. You’re telling them what to do.

 

Brooke Lawson:

I love that. That’s something that a lot of people don’t talk about.

 

Amber Brooks:

So are there any questions? I just want to take a pause to see if there’s any questions.

 

Brooke Lawson:

We’ve got some comments. So let me look through here. Heather says, hi. Tamera says hi. Tammy, LaMorla. Hi everyone! Tamera says benefits are huge and she has trouble with with coach talk. So jargon and stuff like that I’m guessing is what you mean Tamera? That is something that’s very tricky to overcome. I feel it takes practice. Amber said at the beginning, too, just speaking to your audience – that ideal client research. I probably have beat it over everyone’s head by this point, but it is so important to know who you’re talking to and just using the words that they “get” and they understand. So that helps.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Heather and Tamera are having a heart war! Giving us a million hearts. Yay!!

 

Amber Brooks:

I’m glad you brought that up. That’s such a big pet peeve for me. A lot of people in the first couple of years in business say, I don’t need market research! Right? And just blow it off. Right? People. That’s THE one thing you need. If you do nothing else, please, do that. Know your audience.

 

Brooke Lawson:

That’s my number one thing, too!

 

Amber Brooks:

I’m so glad you brought that up.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Or I’ll hear all the time stuff like, I work with women between 20 and 50. And like, no… That’s not enough. That’s not specific enough.

 

Amber Brooks:

Right. So if you’re having a hard time standing out, 9 times out of 10 it’s because you don’t know your audience, right? You don’t know how to speak to them because you don’t know who they are. If you look at someone like – I love to use her as an example, Ash Ambirge. We all love Ash. She knows exactly who her audience is, who they aren’t, right? And she attracts the right people and then repels the wrong people. That’s because she knows her audience. She spent an enormous amount of time getting to know them and can speak directly to them.

 

Brooke Lawson:

She’s such a good example.

 

Amber Brooks:

Yes. That’s where we met, is it not? I believe that’s where we met.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yep, in her group.

 

Amber Brooks:

Okay. Another question I get often, which I haven’t heard yet in your group is point of view. How to I speak – in what point of view do I speak from? In your bio, you want to speak in the first person. And what that means is you’re using I, right? Not – I wouldn’t say in my bio on my website, Amber is a brand strategist and copywriter. I am a service provider. I am my brand. Even though I’m moving to the agency model right now, I’m still the head of my brand. Everything is based around services that I offer. So I’m going to use first person “I” – now if, which I don’t think your audience again is – but if you’re running a bigger agency where it’s run by a board, then at that point where would use something like “we.” But I don’t think that’s either one of our audiences or the people in your group. So in first person. And don’t talk about yourself in the third person, with your name, or like he/she, that kind of thing. It’s just weird.

 

Brooke Lawson:

I agree. It’s weird. I’ve had that conversation with clients a million times. It just feels awkward. Just say it. Just say what you’re going to say.

 

Amber Brooks:

And you know what? I think that’s because a lot of people feel comfortable talking about themselves. They’ll have this innate lack of confidence. Even the most competent people have some form of insecurity. But at the same time, you don’t want to overuse that I pronoun, either. You don’t want to make a conversation all about you. Like, Hey, I’m here and I’m putting myself in the spotlight and it’s all about me. It’s not, it’s about your ideal clients needs. So keep the ”I’s” there, but to a minimum. And if all else fails, write everything you need to write and then edit later. If you’re really feeling stuck and you feel like – I think the other thing is, people get in front of the keyboard and they think they have to get it right and perfect. And you don’t. Just get it down, edit it, it’s going to be fine. You just have to start typing the words out.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah. When Rose was on here, we talked about doing just a shitty first draft and just get it out and then go back and edit.

 

Amber Brooks:

Yes, exactly. I love Rose, too. You have some really great people in this group. It’s so exciting.

 

Brooke Lawson:

I know! I’m so excited!

 

Amber Brooks:

It’s awesome. So I have a download on my website that has all of the steps that we’ve gone through and it also has a template. If you are that personal brand and you need to use the I pronoun, it hasn’t template for you to use there. And then if you have a bigger business where you need to use a second person’s pronoun, then that’s there. So I will post a link to that in the thread so people can download that.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yep. Right now it’s over in the events.

 

Amber Brooks:

And if there are any questions, I am happy to answer them.

 

Amber Brooks:

Yeah, let’s scroll back through here. Heather says the active voice is important. Yes, yes. Tamera says, I was told to take it five levels deep. Like redheads with freckles that have blue eyes and live in California. Okay, so your ideal client, five levels deep. I’ve never heard the five levels thing, but definitely be very, very specific when you’re doing that research. Like, what keeps them up at night? What do they actually want? And what words did they use? So I don’t know if freckles will help you, like if you’re selling makeup or something, then freckles, that would be good to know. But just keep in mind what you need to know for your ideal client. And I do – when I’m going through it with my clients. I don’t know what you do Amber, if you want to tell us, but I like to get super specific for everything that’s relevant and pretend it’s to one person and give them a name. And find a stock photo that looks them. You’re talking to that person. So I don’t know if you want to share what your ideal client process looks like? it’s so important.

 

Amber Brooks:

I do a lot of paid research. I do surveys, interviews, mining groups, mining like, Amazon, and that kind of thing if it’s appropriate. And for my business, I have different ICA’s. So I have my done for you clients, who I am working deeply one on one with. I have my startup clients who I’m teaching things to. And then I actually have a couple of other ICA’s that are brewing right now which I’m getting ready to launch. So what I do is, I mine all of the research, put it together, and then I build a persona for each target segment. And I get specific like you do, I gave him a name. I build them a life, right? So it’s like a little Sim. Do you remember Sims?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yes!!!

 

Amber Brooks:

They’re crazy. So I build them a life and I just drive those pains home and I list out the values that are important to them and what exactly they need. Lay it all out. And everything I do within the different segment, I’m speaking directly to that persona.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yes. Yes, yes.

 

Amber Brooks:

I’ve never heard the five deep thing, either. But it sounds basically like that. Yeah.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, Yup, Yup, Yup, Yup. Heather says you need to know your ideal clients inner monologue. Yup. Yep. Cool.

 

Amber Brooks:

Yes.

 

Brooke Lawson:

So if anyone has any more questions, now the time guys. And then as always, if you have questions later, like during the replay, put them in there, we’ll go back and answer them.

 

Amber Brooks:

Yup.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Amber’s freebie is over in the events tab, but as soon as we get off here, I’ll also put it in the comments of this video so it’s easy to find. Check out her stuff. It’s awesome. And your group, your group is awesome, too if you want to talk about that for a second! Because I know you do all kinds of cool stuff in there.

 

Amber Brooks:

Aw. Yeah. I run The Brandividuation Project. It’s a mouthful! Basically, because what I do is I help individuate brands, right? I help them stand out. So for my one on one clients, that’s what I do. I pull them out of their head and all of their inner magic, put it out there. And so for my group, it’s like, people who are in the first couple of years of business who aren’t quite ready for that big jump. But they still need to be growing, and evolving, and figuring it out. I don’t believe that people who are just starting should be investing thousands of dollars in websites and copy and things like that. Because you’re evolving. It’s going to change very quickly within the first year or two. So what I do in that group is we talk a lot about moving beyond your circumstances and not allowing your circumstances to dictate your destiny. And figuring out how exactly you are able to put yourself into your brand before you get to the point where your brand becomes a mess, right? We do a lot of trainings, workshops, I run contests, just all kinds of craziness. I’m happy to have anyone join and it’s like a big family over there. I love everybody there.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yes, it’s awesome. You guys should join. Cool. Well that looks all of the questions we have. People like it! We’re getting good feedback and so many hearts!!! I love all the hearts! So go join Amber’s group, download her thing, both are awesome. And I will be back on Thursday, maybe sooner, I don’t know for sure yet. Definitely Thursday though. And that’s all we got for you today. So thank you again, everybody who came live.

 

Amber Brooks:

Thank you so much Brooke!

 

Brooke Lawson:

I’m so happy to have everyone! And thank you, Amber! You were so awesome. I know bios are, like you said at the beginning, it’s terrifying for people to talk about themselves. It’s so hard. This was so awesome. Thank you so much.

 

Amber Brooks:

Thank you, Brooke, for having me!

 

Brooke Lawson:

Bye!

 

Amber Brooks:

Bye!

 

Other things you might’ve searched for: online business branding, brand coach, branding coach, brand strategist, branding coach, brand archetypes, brand archetype, brand archetype quiz, how to write my bio, what goes in my bio, how to write a good bio
Love it? Share it with your friends!

Hey, I’m Brooke!

I’m a Creator archetype, INTJ, and music snob. I will fight you if you try to convince me that a MacBook is an instrument. It’s not.

But as far as this whole business thang goes… I’m basically a weird mix of creative-big-picture-thinker and analytical strategery all rolled into one.

I can help you use your unique personality to stand out BOLDLY online and attract your ideal clients like a freakin’ magnet – just by being YOU.


Can’t get enough of  this stuff?!

Check out a few more blog posts

The internet is full of BULLSHIT

The internet is full of BULLSHIT

The internet is full of BULLSHIT
Y’all… there is so much BULLSHIT on the internet lately…

Have you seen it?
Maybe it’s just me…?

I keep seeing post after post after post about how to “make 6 figures” or “work 10 hours per week” or “sign 10 new clients by Friday” and it seems like that’s all anyone wants to talk about anymore…

But what if that’s not your goal?

I mean… it’s not like those are bad goals to have…

But when was the last time you sat down and thought about your actual goals and desires for your biz?

What about doing work you LOVE to do? And how to make that profitable instead of following some “proven 6 figure system”?
What if your goal is to give SO MUCH value to your clients and help them be even more successful?
What if your drive is to be a force of good for your clients so they can’t imagine life without you?
What if the thought of working with 10 clients at once makes you want to barf? (I only work with 5-6 max)
What if you WANT to work more than 10 hours per week because you LOVE it?
What would you even do with that elusive 6 figure income? Shopping spree? Invest it? Travel?

So that stuff just kinda’ pisses me off… assuming that every human is motivated by the same things.

But what pisses me off even more… is the fact that the internet is so effing good at manipulating us into believing that we all need 6 figure, 10 hour, 10 client work weeks. 

Those online posts try to make us believe that if we don’t want those things, then we’re doing something “wrong” or that we won’t be “successful” without them.

And it’s bullshit.

You don’t need to make 6 figures to be successful.
You don’t need to limit your hours to be successful.
You don’t need to over-extend yourself to be successful.
You don’t need to work from the beach to be successful.
You don’t need 20k followers or celebrity status to be successful.
You don’t need to do a single fucking thing you don’t want to do.

You get to decide what will make you successful.

Decide what it is that YOU really want from your business.
Decide on the impact that YOU want to have – on yourself, on your clients, on the whole effing world.
Just decide what YOU want. 
And then make. it. happen.

But don’t believe for one hot second that you have to follow someone else’s idea of success.

Promise?

Love it? Share it with your friends!

Hey, I’m Brooke!

I’m a Creator archetype, INTJ, and music snob. I will fight you if you try to convince me that a MacBook is an instrument. It’s not.

But as far as this whole business thang goes… I’m basically a weird mix of creative-big-picture-thinker and analytical strategery all rolled into one.

I can help you use your unique personality to stand out BOLDLY online and attract your ideal clients like a freakin’ magnet – just by being YOU.


Can’t get enough of  this stuff?!

Check out a few more blog posts

3 ways to establish visibility in your online biz with Heather Hartman

3 ways to establish visibility in your online biz with Heather Hartman

3 ways to establish visibility in your online biz with Heather Hartman

Heather Hartman Johnson from Heather Hartman – Visibility & Confidence Expert is heeeeere!!!

Heather is sharing the TOP 3 things you can be doing to establish / build visibility in your online biz, including:

  1. doing LIVE video + the BEST tips I’ve ever heard on HOW to do this (even if you being on video makes you want to pee your pants from terror)
  2. using branding photoshoots to up your game and show your personality
  3. the importance of consistency in showing up and just being your-effing-self

Heather’s website: https://www.heatherhartman.com

Download Heather’s “10 Stupid-Simple Strategies to Help You Build Your Confidence and Be Seen As The Badass You Really Are!”: http://bit.ly/10stupidsimplestrategies

*NOTE* This video was recorded LIVE inside my Facebook group, Brand Boldly for Service-Based Entrepreneurs as a #SpotlightSunday feature. Join the group to participate LIVE and get YOUR biz featured to the group for free.

Not a video person? No worries.

Read the audio transcription below

Brooke Lawson:

Hello everyone. We are live here for #SpotlightSunday with Heather Hartman Johnson. Is It, I noticed your coaching business is just Hartman, is it? I’ve been putting Heather Hartman Johnson on everything. So whatever you want us to call you. So, Heather is a Visibility and Confidence expert. Right. Okay. Awesome. Yeah, so I just butchered your intro so I’m going to let you, I’m going to let you just step in and take over and tell us a little bit about yourself and your business first and then we’ll dive in.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah, definitely. Thank you so much Brooke. I like legit am super excited to be here. Thank you for having me on. And you didn’t even butcher my intro. It’s all good. I didn’t think that so totally don’t even worry about it. I’m used to it. No I’m kidding. So basically, um, what I do is I work with newer female entrepreneurs who are service based who kind of are a little bit afraid to be seen. I help them monetize their visibility and figure out what they’re like big message is and how to get it out into the world confidently so that they can actually get clients and get paid. Because we started online business because, not just to have like it be a hobby, right. We have our businesses because we want them to be businesses. So I like to basically help the women that I work with do that. And it’s, I’m really passionate about it because when I first started it was, I was like floundering.

 

Heather Hartman:

I was doing the whole hobby thing and I was like, why am I not making money. This really sucks. And it was because I had a deep fear of being seen. And so, um, basically, you know, I mean that’s pretty much what I do. Um, do, I don’t know if you want like fun facts or anything?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Whatever you want to share. I think that’s so awesome though. Like I think that’s so just your whole thing is so needed right now cause that’s like the number one thing I hear over and over and over again is just being terrified of putting yourself out there. So I love it.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah, I know. I was going to say my favorite, favorite thing to do is like Facebook lives and really encourage people to get on Facebook live and actually do Facebook lives. Cause it’s like the best way to get seen in the online space right now. So, and I don’t see that changing in the near future either, especially with algorithms and stuff like that. So

 

Brooke Lawson:

Live is definitely the way to go. So yeah. Fun Facts. Let’s hear some fun facts.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah. Oh my gosh. Okay. I actually, this is funny cause I just was thinking about this the other day and I was posting in a group and um, like I guess I’ll share three of my favorite fun facts. I was born raised in Anchorage, Alaska. I was a diesel mechanic when I was 21 working on like Van Hool buses for a tour company in Alaska. And then I also, I worked as a stripper in a strip club.

 

Brooke Lawson:

There you go! Those are definitely fun facts!

 

Heather Hartman:

Random as fuuuck.

 

Brooke Lawson:

So that’s like a, the diesel mechanic too is like a huge jump. The stripper. I mean I get that with the visibility and confidence. Hey, that makes you like a pro at it. Right?

 

Heather Hartman:

Exactly. Actually, after two months I was like you guys got take me off the schedule. I ain’t cut out for this shit.

 

Brooke Lawson:

That’s awesome. Well those are definitely fun facts. I love it.

 

Heather Hartman:

Well, they’re not really related to business, but fun nonetheless.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Definitely fun. Cool. So before we jump in to like learn more about your, your thing, um, I always like to ask everybody that comes on, like what is your definition of branding and how does it affect your business?

 

Heather Hartman:

I freaking love this question. I love it because actually I’m not a branding expert, but I feel really passionate that what branding is essentially is we, it’s us, it’s me, it’s my essence, it’s my personality, it’s how I show up and how I make people feel. And to me that is the definition of what I believe branding is. And you know, it goes along with my energy, with my attitude, with the way that, you know, again, the way that I show I’m showing up and the way I make people feel. And why it’s important in business is because branding is what sets us apart from other people. And we all know there’s a lot of people in this, in the online space doing a lot of the same things. You know, there’s a lot of visibility coaches, there’s a lot of branding experts, there’s a lot of fricken health coaches, there’s a lot of, you know what I mean? It’s like there was a ton of different people in the space. However, branding is what makes us unique. It’s how we set ourselves apart from the other people in the industry. And you know, I think it’s also how we attract our people to us. You know?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Exactly. Exactly. I love it. That’s such a good answer. I love it. Well, that’s awesome. So we can talk about branding a little bit more later on. I want to like focus this part of the call on, you know, what you want to teach us. We want to learn about how to, how to be visible and confident while we’re doing it. And then at the end, if anyone has questions about anything that you say or anything branding related, we’ll stay on and answer whatever anyone has got.

 

Heather Hartman:

But you’re sure. Yeah. I wonder if, does anybody have questions so far? I can’t see the comments, so I don’t know.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Not yet. But if anybody does have questions, put them in as we go.

 

Heather Hartman:

Perfect. Awesome. Okay, cool. So I really just wanted to talk about like three main points. Um, the most important things that I have personally found in my own business at doing visibility coaching and just being in the online coaching and consulting space in general. So the first thing I wanted to really just kind of dig into going live, right? Doing live video. And I know that you do a lot of live video and I frigging love your live videos. You’re amazing. I do, I love doing live video and I love watching them too. And so a couple of things under the live video, like, like some subtopics, right? A lot of people like to watch live video. Some people don’t like to watch live video. And the, the reason why you want to go live is because for those people who like to consume content in a video format such as this, that is why you go live. So you can be seen. So that you can share your, you know, your message and share yourself with your people. Right? Like I feel like, don’t you think that’s important?

 

Brooke Lawson:

I do think that’s really important and I think it helps, at least for me and my business going live as opposed to just like pre-recorded video even helps so much. Just be more yourself and be more real. I’ve, I’ve found like if I prerecord a video, I’ll do it like 75,000 freakin times and if I go live, I’m just like welp, I just said that. That happened. So move on. And I feel like I get, I get a better reaction from my audience too when I go live. So I, I love it. I think it’s super important.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah, for sure. And one of the things I love about, uh, the aspect of live is that you have that like sense of, it’s like a built in sense of authenticity and rawness, right? Like if you, you know, I mean things happen, right? Dogs bark and babies cry and people open doors and you know, you’re alive and it’s, it’s like almost like, Hey, I’m human too. Like I have these things happen too. And so I think that’s a really good way to be relatable to people so that people can see, oh yeah, yeah. And I also have the same experience. Like I pre-recorded videos. I literally am like, I have taken up so much of my iCloud space. You know? And then I’m like, delete all of these damn things. So it’s almost, you know, the, the sense of being live with your audience. It’s a sense of being present also. And they really get a flavor for like, what, okay, what do you actually bring to the table? What is your, like your real flavor of authenticity and your actual YOU, the bits of you that you can’t see when you read a post, you can’t really hear inflection when you, you know what I’m saying?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah.

 

Heather Hartman:

So that was the one thing, the number one thing that I really love to talk about and share about and teach about. Um, and you know, I think that in a big way doing live video also helps us get out of our comfort zone to be seen. And to show up. So that’s a really big thing. And you know, I think that, um, there are lot of people who are still really hesitant to do live video. I help people get past that initial fear of like, well I can’t, I don’t want to go live. You know, there’s a lot of people who do love it, but there are still many who are fearful or terrified of being on camera.

 

Brooke Lawson:

So how, like what do you, what are like your top tips that you would tell those people that are just starting out?

 

Heather Hartman:

Totally. I love it. Actually the first one is like, really, um, I like to have dance parties. This is what I used to do before I went live when I was still like, oh my God, I literally would like put on some crazy rave music or like [???], or I put like Taylor Swift on and I just like shake my booty and get super energized. And then, uh, as soon as the song was over I’d be like, I have to go live, ok I’m here, I’m doin this! So, you know, the thing is if you don’t dance, do jumping jacks. Do pushups. Do something like move your body. Because what is really important to remember is that we have a lot of nervous energy that sorts of built, it starts to build up in our bodies and as we move our body and change our physiology, it makes it so much easier to like, it’s almost like, like it’s a cheaper way of drinking alcohol. Um, so that’s my like first number one tip is always, like seriously, just jam out before you go live. And then some of my other tips are more like, look into the camera lens. Not at your reflection in the computer or on your phone cause it’s really obvious and it can be a little distracting for people. But also when you, um, you know, when you’re looking into the camera lens, I think that it gives people a much better sense of your presence with them and you’re really more able to like actually hold space and be present and just be there with the people who are watching your viewers, you know. Um, and sometimes, you know, like I know there are people who are like, I just don’t know. I have like, I can’t, I can’t, I always look at myself, but you can like, you can put like a piece of paper over your monitor or you could put like a hot pink sticky note right by the, you know, right by the camera lens so that you’re like focused on that one point.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Wow, that’s such a good, those are awesome. Like I would have never thought of doing either one of those things. But that’s so true. That’s so important. It’s both of those tthings are.

 

Heather Hartman:

Totally. And it can be really easy. And then, like I said, to get distracted by your own reflection, especially if you’re nervous and you don’t and you’re afraid you’re going to mess up. You don’t know what you know, you’re like, I don’t know how to stay on track.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Or I’ll see people sometimes on live video just like constantly messing with their hair. Just talk.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah, totally. I hear you. Um, and then I guess, you know, a couple of the other ones… I’ve been talking about this so much lately because I’ve, like I said, I’ve been seeing a lot of people who are like, I want to go live or I’m going to do my first live. Do you have tips? And you know, some of the other things really just come down to have a topic. Um, I like to do one topic, like a main topic and then I like that just really shorthand three subtopics that are under that main topic and like have a handwritten note just by me. So I don’t like lose track. It’s really simple and you know, we don’t have to be scripted. Like I, I think a lot of people think they need to be scripted in order to be good on video, but it’s not true. Like, you know, and the, the last thing I’ll say about doing live that that is so important is just be you. Like show up as you. You can be quirky, silly, stupid. I mean, you know what I mean? I have there, there’s no wrong way to show up if you’re showing up authentically as yourself, period. Like I, I’ve watched literally I’ve watched people like burp online video and laugh and about it and not even care. And it’s like, yeah.

 

Brooke Lawson:

So Tamera says, I forget to smile. How do you remember to smile? More like smoking, smile-talking. I have the opposite problem. Like while, I was watching a replay of one of the past #SpotlightSundays and I’m just sitting here smiling like a giant dork while Tanya was talking. I was like, what am I doing? But yeah, so smiling. Do you have tips about that?

 

Heather Hartman:

Totally. Well, and you know, I think sometimes, this is one of the things that I actually have heard recently is like when you’re doing video, it’s almost like you kind of have to flirt with the camera a little bit. You kind of come like flirt with the audience just a little bit and it’s almost as if you’re flirting with yourself basically. You know what I’m saying? And it’s kind of like, I think that’s a good way to loosen up and get a little comfortable with just being on camera and doing live video, you know, just like loosen up. Feel a little saucy. Get a little spicy. You know. And in that way I think it’s really when you have, an even something else you can do too is sticky notes on your laptop or wherever, like on your desk or whatever to remind you, you know, smile, breathe, be excited. You know, like easy stuff like that. Cause I like, I’m a big person who like needs reminders all the time. I need to remind myself like everything so.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Cool. I love that. I love sticky notes. I’m going to have to try that. I’m going to have to put one that says don’t smile like a giant dork if it’s not appropriate to smile.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah exactly. Or the other thing is don’t eye fuck the camera either. Don’t be like… [Heather stares creepily into the camera]…

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, that’s really awkward. I’ve seen some of those. I know exactly what you’re talking about when you say that. That’s awesome. That’s awesome. Well, cool. So yeah, live that’s super important. Obviously. I love it. I love all of your tips. Um, but yeah, so you said you had some other stuff too though, right? Like besides the lives?

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah! The other thing I was going to talk about just a little bit is branding shoots. Okay. So when I’m saying branding shoots, I mean an actual legit branding photo shoot that what you can, and I’ll share a little bit about my experience with it. And I think that this is something that you can get, um, at any stage in your business. Um, personally I waited until I was like, you know, a year and a half or so in because I still wasn’t really comfortable or confident with what am I doing and how do I really want to show up and how do I want to, how do I want to portray my business and my personality. So, um, what in the branding shoot, what I wanted was I wanted my photographs to like really exude my personality, like my silliness and my crazy faces, like my weird ridiculous posture and stuff like that like I did and legitimately it was the most fun I’ve ever had doing a photo shoot ever. I had brought my, um, it was like a little Bose bluetooth speaker and it like bumps super loud and I carry around in my purse during the whole shoot. I made an entire playlist, like a bomb ass photo shoot playlist, and it was like all super fun songs, like really upbeat, really exciting and happy and like I really just want it to like embody that, that energy of fun and you know, boldness and excitement and I really like adventure and freedom. Those are like my values, my core values. And it was amazing. And the thing that really I think made it so really awesome was that I had to actually do some homework beforehand. You know, the person who was taking my photos was like, he gave me an entire branding profile to fill out. It was like a seven page frickin packet I had to do. And I like, it really made me think about, oh, how do I want for my brand to look and feel to people, you know? And how can I infuse more of my authenticity into the brands so that people who are attracted to my energy and who like my, um, being, will find me? You know?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah. Oh, and they’re awesome, too. All of your pictures are amazing, so it worked, whatever you did!

 

Heather Hartman:

Thank you! Yeah, it was a lot of fun. And you know, I think that, um, for me it was a worthwhile investment and I think that they’re probably photographers who don’t necessarily, who, there’s a range of different, you know, prices to invest in for a photographers that do that kind of thing. But it’s a really cool thing to do if you want to, and for me it really helped me find myself and how I wanted it to be in my business and how I wanted to apply them. So like getting, and the other thing, what I really wanted to share about is that like I think, I think I, I think I spent like 36 or $3,700 on my branding shoot. It was a worthwhile investment. It’s a lot of money for people. So I know not everyone can afford to do that and that’s totally fine. But what I do think is that, you could even have a girlfriend come over and take, you know, shots with your iPhone or whatever. Cause some of the newer iPhones have uh-friggin-mazing cameras. And you don’t have to have like a huge budget to do, you know, a big ass branding shoot. But you can still infuse your personality and your attitude and like, you know, bits of you even just with like in one of your besties coming over with the camera phone.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, definitely. I think that’s awesome that you say that. Cause like the first photo shoot that I did it, she’s, she’s not a brand photographer and it wasn’t that they were, like they’re not, they’re awesome. Like I love them. But I think it’s like if you have a girlfriend come over or somebody that doesn’t do that all the time, that’s where you have to come in and you have to know exactly what you want and give them direction. So like I remember during the photo shoot we like, we got to the very end and she was like, okay, is there anything else you want? I was like, can I just stand by this wall and make a bunch of goofy faces and like pretend like I’m pointing at things? And those are like my favorite ones are the ones I use for everything. Like the banner in my group.

 

Heather Hartman:

Seriously, that’s epic, I love it.

 

Brooke Lawson:

It’s awesome. So just like you don’t have to hire that amazing brand photographer that first time, but you do have to, you know, come prepared and know what you want. And be able to articulate what you want. So I love that. That’s awesome.

 

Heather Hartman:

And one other like super easy tip, too, is if you want to do like something like that where you just have a friend come over or uh, a really reasonably priced photographer and look up like photo shoot poses. Like you can even look up branding shoot poses on like Pinterest and make a board so that you have ideas for like what you want if you aren’t really sure and you’re just not 100% like you know, you don’t know how you want them to look or whatever. You’d get a lot of really cool ideas and like whatever you jive with, that’s your authentic personality. So like do it. You know, bang it out.

 

Brooke Lawson:

I did that exact thing. I have a whole board, a brand photography board. Because it’s so awkward to just, you know, it’s awkward to pose anyway, but that’s where that brand photographer is handy because they know what’s going to look good and what’s not. But that’s awesome. That’s such a good tip. I love it.

 

Heather Hartman:

And then the last thing that I was wanting to share really quick about this is, this is the most important thing I think actually. Showing up consistently. Right like, and I wanted to kind of like share my learning around what does it mean to show up consistently cause I think a lot of people have, maybe an. There’s a lot of misconception about what is it like, what is showing up consistently? What does that mean? Do I have to be the fucking same every time I show up? Do I have to be the same? Do I have to like have the same attitude and the same personality like all the time when I show up, right? Do I have to be the same on live video every time I go live or whatever? And I just want to say that no you don’t. You don’t have to be the same. You just have to show up consistently. And what, for me, what consistently means is, be you consistently. Like today I went live in my group, fucked up hair, I just woke up from a two hour nap and I was like, I really wanted to put on a really big show for you guys so I could like announce the winner of this awesome, you know, drawing our whatever, of the challenge and I was like, yeah, I’m not, I’m not feeling it. So I’m just gonna go live and what they didn’t know is I wasn’t even wearing pants!

 

Brooke Lawson:

Hey, that’s the cool thing about working from home, right? I got my yoga pants today.

 

Heather Hartman:

Work those yoga pants! I love it. I love it. So I think that’s a really important thing to, for people to remember is that showing up consistently just means be you. If you’re having a shitty day, show up and fucking have a shitty day. If you don’t have to fake it, you don’t get to pretend like everything’s peaches and roses. You know? It’s like, and for, I think this is one of the things, because for me, I’m a really happy, bubbly, upbeat, energetic person. And I, I feel like people might see me and think I’m always like this, but I’m not like, that’s why there are days when I’m just fuckin’ bitchy.

 

Brooke Lawson:

And that’s okay! That’s allowed!

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah exactly! And it’s like, I think that what we all have to remember is that it’s okay to be whatever we are in whatever moment. And there’s nothing wrong with sharing it online, right? Like, in your business. Especially if you’re like, I just, I dunno, that’s my whole thing. The whole like riff on authenticity. Just show up as you and don’t worry about what people think. You’re going to create polarity. If you’re showing up authentically, there are going to be people who don’t like it. There will be people who are triggered. There will be people who don’t want to see, you know, who aren’t comfortable with authenticity or rawness or any kind of emotionality at all. You know what I mean? So I think the biggest thing to remember is just fuckin’ show up as you, every time.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yup. And the, the people who are meant to be there, will be there and they’ll love it. They’ll love you even more for it.

 

Heather Hartman:

Mmmhmm, absolutely.

 

Brooke Lawson:

So that’s awesome. I love it. Such good freakin’ tips. So I’m, I’m so glad you came on here because that’s like something that I hear all the time and it’s just not my thing. You know, like I struggle with it, too. So, you know, some of the stuff that I’ve heard is like, you know, get equipment that makes you, you know, like if you need a little light or sit in front of a window that has good lighting and focus on that, but your like your tips are so much better.

 

Heather Hartman:

Oh, thank you! Totally. The dance party is epic, I swear the dance party will change, it’s a game changer. A game changer. Right. Serious.

 

Brooke Lawson:

That’s awesome. I love it. I love it. So for anybody that came in late, it looks like we had a few people come in late. Definitely watch the replay because this video is like full of stuff. So I’m going to read through some of the comments real quick and make sure we didn’t miss any important questions. Um, Tamera’s doing a photo shoot in August. So that’s exciting! She said, can you edit my constipated face? Pants are optional. Going to rewatch the replay. Yes. Rewatch the replay for sure. Yep. Awesome. So yeah. So I’m so excited that you came in here and shared all of these awesome tips with us and, yeah. Watch the replay. If anybody has any questions, now is the time for Heather or myself.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah, totally. No holds barred. Any question is a good question.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, for sure. So branding, like my group is about branding. If anybody doesn’t know that yet, if you just came over here to see Heather, that’s okay. You can leave if you want, when we’re done, if you don’t want to stay, I’m totally cool with that. But just, um, I think branding and visibility are so closely tied together. It’s so important to talk about both of those things together. And you, you touched on that a little bit earlier, but just owning it, really being yourself and owning it is so important. And that’s like the number one thing really, in my book.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah, definitely.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Tamera says, thank you so much Heather. So Heather, if you check out the events tab over, like in the sidebar, there’s a, Heather’s information is all pinned in there, her website, and she has an awesome freebie. Do you want to talk about your, your freebie real quick?

 

Heather Hartman:

Oh, sure, sure. Um, well the freebie really is basically 10, you know, simple ways to really build your confidence. And I think they’re, um, you know, it’s like as an example, one of them is wear clothes that make you feel good, you know? And like I think that in a really big way we have a tendency to like try to mold ourselves into like what societal norms are, you know, make us feel like we need to be like, and I think it’s really important that those types of things that we remember that right? Like do things that make us feel good, where clothes that make us feel good and do a freaking negativity detox. If you’ve got negative people in your life, limit your exposure to those people. You know what I’m saying? So, I know those are like two of the 10, but like, in order to build your confidence, there are some really simple things that you can do that really don’t cost any money. And it’s just an awareness that something to think about, you know? So anyway, yeah, there’s like a ton of good stuff in there too. And like it was all kinds of Heather spicy attitude.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Which we love! We love the Heather spicy attitude! That’s awesome. So yeah, watch the replay. If you have any questions, you know, while you’re watching the replay, feel free to tag either one of us or both of us or whatever you want.

 

Heather Hartman:

And do you have a little something that you wanted to kind of share a little bit about like branding and like when is a good time to like do that? Cause I think I thought some of the folks, at least I know some of the ladies in my group would probably appreciate kind of hearing a little bit from your perspective as an expert on it.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, definitely. Sorry, we totally talked about that and I just totally forgot. Um, so there’s kind of like two different sides of branding, which, you know, part of my mission of what I’m trying to do with my business is kind of bridge the gap and, and really communicate what branding really means. Because a lot of times people think it’s just that logo and website and pretty stuff. We know that’s not true. But yeah. Um, so if, if we’re talking about like stuff like that, the, the pretty design and all of that, that should be like the very last thing that you invest in. Like, last step. But building your brand and you know, talking about like identifying your ideal client and I know that’s like beaten over everyone’s head all over the Internet all the time, but it’s like it’s super important, it’s really important. And that should be like the first thing that you do before anything else. Like identify who it is that you want to work with first of all, like that part of your ideal client. Not, not, don’t learn about them until you decide who they are. Cause you get to decide who you want to work with and what you want to do. So that should be like when you’re thinking about, hmm I want to start a business, that should be that the very first thing that you do and it doesn’t cost a penny. Like yeah, you can do that stuff yourself. And obviously you can hire a branding person who can help you with that. But just like understanding what you really want to do and then identifying those things that should be like step one. Then once, once you get like, I felt like you should do it in phases, almost like do that, that inner work and identifying all that stuff. And then once you’re ready to like, okay, I need to like get in front of people. You do need to have some kind of brand presence, you know, online. Um, even if it’s something as simple as just like a lead page or a landing page or just something to represent yourself.

 

Heather Hartman:

That’s what I did! That’s what I did for the first year and a half of my business, legit. I used fucking landing pages, I love it.

 

Brooke Lawson:

And that’s awesome. It works. Like it’s totally fine. So I think there’s like a misconception that like you have to have this big, huge fancy, awesome website and all of this stuff and you don’t, but you do have to have something and you don’t want it to be shitty either. Like, if you’re only gonna do one thing, you want to do it right, but it doesn’t have to be expensive and it doesn’t have to be elaborate and this huge time suck or anything like that. But you do want to have some kind of presence for sure. And then once you’re ready, like once you have some income coming in and you’re ready to invest in all that stuff. And even like something that’s most, most branding experts don’t really talk about that. I love to talk about, this is my, for people in my group, my archetypes, my sagey side comes out. Like my analytical mind, I love like systems and automations and processes and stuff like that. So having all of that automation set up on the backend, it like for me and my business, that’s a part of my brand too. Like when, when my clients interact with me, there’s like a certain level of experience that I give them. Like all of my automated stuff is very me. And everything is branded. Even if it’s just a simple like, hey, I got your form. It’s like it’s me. And I think that’s something that a lot of people skip in the branding process for sure. So that’s something that you can do as early as you can. Like anytime you’re setting up any kind of system or anything like that, incorporate as much of you and your personality into it every step of the way.

 

Heather Hartman:

I really like that too because you know, there’s a lot of systems that you can just do the canned stuff or the default, whatever the default thank you page or whatever. And it’s like, it’s, it’s so much, uh, the energy’s just different when it’s branded, when it is your personality, when it’s your language. So I really love that. And also, I did want to say too, for any of the ladies who are watching from, um, who came from my group or anybody new or whatever, that, um, you have an awesome archetype quiz too, right?

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yes, I do.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah. So check out Brooks archetype quiz. I actually need to take it. I’ve taken one before from another branding expert, but I would love to take yours. I need to actually.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, they’re so fun. And I love taking other people’s quizzes too. Like I think it’s so interesting to see how like all the different experts kind of like pull, pull different parts of the archetypes out. And it’s fun. Yeah. So it’s definitely fun.

 

Heather Hartman:

I’m going to do it for sure. So actually, if you are willing, maybe you could drop that link into the, into the explosive exposure group if you’re willing.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Sure, absolutely. Yeah, that’s the name of Heather’s group. If you want to join Heather’s group. Explosive, explosure, explosive explosion. I can’t talk exposure, you know what I mean? Oh and Tamera just put a link to my archetype quiz in the comments here, too. So I’ll also drop it in your group. Um, Tamera also is asking, is branding important with network marketers too? I have a lot of network marketers and some have it ingrained that they are their product. I think, I don’t personally work with network marketers. I don’t know about you, but I think it is important. I think a lot of the branding, you know, especially in something like that where everybody is selling the exact same product, that’s really the only thing that you have that set yourself apart. And whether you’re consciously doing it or not, you’re, you’re building a brand for yourself, whether it’s conscious or not. So all of the, like the automation, the follow up sequences and just how you interact with your, with your clients, that’s building a brand. So you might as well might as well do it intentionally.

 

Heather Hartman:

Yeah, for sure, I hear you. I actually don’t work that much with network marketers either. However, I am in network marketing, so, and I see how that building that brand and having that basically that personality and that energetic connection to, you know, what I do and why I’m passionate about it can really be set apart from the other Mary Kay lady or whatever. I don’t do Mary Kay. I do a different one. But that makes perfect sense. Yeah.

 

Brooke Lawson:

So yeah. So we’ll wait just another minute and make sure there’s no more questions. But again, like anybody watching the replay, put in questions that you have, and thank you so, so much for coming in Heather! This has been so much.

 

Heather Hartman:

Thanks for having me, Brooke! I super love your face and I just want to tell you, I love your background, too, like get shit done. It’s like, that’s epic. So amazing. I was like, admiring it one of your other live videos.

 

Brooke Lawson:

Yeah, I love it. I talked about it in one of the other ones too, because somebody else said that. My mommy made it for me.

 

Heather Hartman:

Aw, that’s so sweet! Very cool. Awesome. Well thank you, Brooke, again. I appreciate it!

 

Brooke Lawson:

All right, well I will see everybody again. Um, definitely Thursday, maybe sooner. Sometimes I just jump in here so you never know exactly, but I will see you then. Bye Heather!

 

Heather Hartman:

Bye!!

 

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Hey, I’m Brooke!

I’m a Creator archetype, INTJ, and music snob. I will fight you if you try to convince me that a MacBook is an instrument. It’s not.

But as far as this whole business thang goes… I’m basically a weird mix of creative-big-picture-thinker and analytical strategery all rolled into one.

I can help you use your unique personality to stand out BOLDLY online and attract your ideal clients like a freakin’ magnet – just by being YOU.


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